Teaching Tagalog to our Kids, Part 1: Flashcards and Books

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I’m Canadian, my husband is from the Philippines and our son was born in Korea (You can read more about our family’s story here!). We of course want our son to love and appreciate his Filipino heritage and a big part of that is learning to speak Tagalog. By being able to speak Tagalog he will be able to connect with his father’s country and join in conversations with his family and other Filipinos more deeply than if he only spoke English.

Teaching him to speak Tagalog while we live in Korea though has been a challenge. Our son attends preschool taught in Korean and he hears Korean everywhere when he leaves the house. My husband and I speak English to each other and it’s easy to find English books, videos and toys either in Korea or online. Though I have studied Tagalog, teaching it to our son is primarily left up to daddy and it isn’t even his first language.

My husband grew up in Negros Occidental on the border of the Ilonggo and Cebuano language regions. They spoke one language at home and when they went to the market they spoke the other.  When he started school his classes were in English and Tagalog so, by the time he was 6 years old he was using the 4 languages on a regular basis. After college he would go on to learn to speak Japanese while living there for 2 years and later learnt to speak Korean before going to Korea to work. I’ve seen him have conversations with groups of people switching back and forth between 3 – 4 different languages! So while he can speak Tagalog he doesn’t use it often and sometimes he struggles to find the words for things.

We tried using the very effective one parent one language technique in our home. I would speak English and my husband Tagalog but since my husband and I were speaking English to each other we would always forget to have him switch to Tagalog when he spoke with our son. Despite knowing many families in Korea with at least one Filipino parent, we have only been able to find 2 families in our city who were also teaching their children Tagalog. One has left and we have lost contact with the other family. A cultural center in our city offered us free space to hold language and cultural classes for Filipino kids but there was no interest from the Filipino community. We have visited Filipino groceries, sporting events, restaurants and churches to expose our son to Tagalog here in Korea as well but people go to these places to spend time with their friends and so he may hear the language but doesn’t get to practice it much at all.

We realized that we were going to have to collect resources to help us to teach our son. Here are some we have used. I hope they can help your family as well!

Tagalog for Kids Flash Cards

We bought the Tuttle Tagalog for Kids and the More Tagalog for Kids flashcards before our son was even born!  Each set includes 64 cards, an audio CD, a poster wall chart and a learning guide for parents with teaching suggestions. On the front of the card is a simple graphic in color with the word in Tagalog. On the back of the card is the English translation and a couple of sentences using the vocabulary word. The CD includes the pronunciation of the words, sentences and some songs.

            

Before our son could even talk he loved looking through the cards and having us tell him over and over what they said. We visited the Philippines for the first time when he was about a year and a half old and as soon as we got out of the airport he started pointing and excitedly yelling “Jeepney! Jeepney!” He had learnt about Jeepney from these cards. Though they are made from strong paper I would recommend having the cards laminated if possible. We ended up laminating ours and it has made them easier to clean and more difficult to damage. Now that our son is older we can work on the sentences with him.

Books

We struggled a bit to find good books in Tagalog but over the past 4 years more have been showing up on the market. We wanted fun and educational stories for our son but we found that a lot of the available Tagalog books are religious or political in content even for very small children. While this is fine for many families, we wanted to keep the topics more lighthearted when he was very young. Another reoccurring theme in many children’s’ books are balikbayan returnee stories. These are a fantastic resource for children who are learning Tagalog because their families are going to move to the Philippines. In our case I was worried that if our son keeps on reading about how he should be moving back to the Philippines he might feel guilty about living abroad. I might be worrying too much though!

It is possible to get books for children in Tagalog online and at the National Bookstore in the Philippines but at the bookstore the Tagalog selection is far smaller than the English book section.  At two of the National Bookstores we visited in the Philippines the employees didn’t even know where the Tagalog children’s book sections were! My husband and I had to search through all the aisles and show them. It was really shocking!

Here are some of our favorite Tagalog kids books:

Lakas and the Manilatown Fish / Si Lakas at ang Isdang Manilatown

Lakas and the Manilatown Fish / Si Lakas at ang Isdang Manilatown was the very first Tagalog book that we got for our son. The story follows Lakas through Manila town in San Francisco as he chases a magical fish and meets unusual characters along the way.  It is a dual language book. On the left side the story is written in Tagalog and on the right it is written in English so in our family daddy reads it in Tagalog and mommy reads it in English. It is aimed at children age 5 and up but we started reading it to our son when he was a baby. The beautiful illustrations kept his attention and he just enjoyed listening to us. Years later, he still enjoys it. The author and illustrator have released a second book Lakas and the Makibaka Hotel / Si Lakas at ang Makibaka Hotel but we have not had the chance to read it yet.

            

Filipino Friends

The book Filipino Friends has been created in the same style as the classic English language Richard Scarry books. The objects in the illustrations have been labeled in both English and Tagalog. The story is only in English though. Included among the pages are points teaching about Filipino culture, foods and even a simple recipe for kalamansi juice!  We enjoy singing Bahay Kubo together when we reach that section of the book. This book does end up being a balikbayan returnee story but it is so full of fun cultural bits we just couldn’t pass it up!

Tagu-Taguan

The illustrations alone in Tagu-Taguan are reason to buy this Filipino counting book! From sampu to isa the reader travels through the garden counting different insects. This book is a bit too difficult for children who are learning to count to read on their own but is a great book to read together as a family. Our son is an insect and number lover so this book was an instant favorite!

Kokak! Kokak!

We actually have 3 books in this series. “Kokak! Kokak!”, “ Mmmmm… Sarap!” and “Prrrrrt…Utot!” There are others in the series as well by the same author and illustrator. They’re funny little books with simple big graphics and few words on the page for young learners.  They can be purchased online and shipped internationally through http://www.anvilpublishing.com/ We got ours at National Bookstore and will be looking for more the next time we visit!

            

 

Adarna House Books

Adarna House Books have been publishing quality books for newborn to teenaged Filipino children since 1980. The following books can all be purchased through http://adarna.com.ph/ and shipped internationally.  They are also available at the National Book Store in the Philippines

Dumaan si Butiki

The award winning Dumaan si Butiki follows a cute little lizard up and down and around the house. It is a young learner’s board book that teaches locations as the little lizard goes left, right, up and under. It can be purchased online and shipped internationally through we purchased our copy in the Philippines.

Ang Una Kong Alpabeto and Kulay!

These two books are small board books with only one or two words on each page. Ideal for babies, they’re nice first books for little hands.

       

Ang Mabait na Kalabaw

We love carabao (just like lolo’s!) and so any book that features them is a hit in our family! Ang Mabait na Kalabaw is a dual language book with Tagalog at the top of the page and English at the bottom.  The good carabao is a role model of good behavior as he goes about his day. There are items to count on each page as well starting at 1 on the first page and finishing with 13 in the last illustration.

Check out part 2 here: Teaching Tagalog to our Kids, Part 2: Batibot!

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Teaching Tagalog to our Kids, Part 2: Batibot

This article is part 2 on resources we have been using to help us teach our son Tagalog while we are living in South Korea and traveling internationally. These resources can help others teaching children Tagalog both in the Philippines and abroad Please check out part 1 here: Teaching Tagalog to our Kids, Part 1: Flashcards and Books

Batibot

I know what you are probably thinking. "What?! Batibot is still around?" Well the answer is "Yes and no". Like many kids across North America I grew up with Sesame Street and it was also one of the first TV shows our son ever watched. Fun and educational with songs you remember for a lifetime. For many Filipinos growing up in the 80’s and 90’s the equivalent was Batibot! The show was based on Sesame Street and was even originally co-produced with the Children’s Television Workshop. It was on the air from 1985-1998 and then resurrected from 2010 – 2013 before going off the air again.

Try as we may though we have not found much more than a few blurry incomplete episodes on Youtube of Batibot. We have looked online, asked in the facebook groups, searched video hosting sites, and asked in book and video stores in the Philippines and nothing! We aren’t the only people looking. Plenty of online forums are full of parents searching for the show but to this date, despite the demand, DVD's of the series have not been released. The best quality videos you can find of Batibot are from the Batibot saYoutube channel but they only have 9 videos available and the channel hasn't been updated in 4 years. Unfortunately, there just doesn’t seem to be any sort of equivalent in an educational children’s show for young learners in Tagalog these days. 

Batibot Apps

In August 2015 an app based on the Batibot TV program aimed at children from kindergarten to grade 3 was released. There are currently 2 apps:

Cover art                Cover art

Batibot TV and Batibot Games.

I’m not really sure what the purpose of having a separate download for Batibot Games is since the same games are also included in the more extensive Batibot TV app. So, if you’re looking for just games that option is there but from here I’ll just write about Batibot TV. The Batibot TV app includes 4 sections Kwenteng Batibot (stories), ABC, Games and Karaoke.


   Batibot TV- screenshot

Kwenteng Batibot

Kwenteng Batibot currently includes 14 videos to download. The stories are about 5 minutes long and feature simple animations or puppets along with the narrator. Our son enjoyed all of them even though he couldn’t understand them all fully. There seem to be some glitches with this section still. You need to download all of the free stories individually which can take a long if your internet is slow. Even though we have already downloaded all of the stories I often get a pop up asking me if we would like to download our first story. When I click back and enter the story section again the stories are all loaded. Other times I need to re-download “Ang Tinapay” and/or “Paalam”. In general though this section is kid friendly and educational.

ABC

The ABC section has all the letters of the Filipino alphabet. The letter name is said and a word starting with that letter is given. Some of the words, seem to be strange choices for very young children. For example, for “C” the word is “cadena de amor”. Most though are great examples of words related to Filipino culture. There is also a section where children can practice writing the letters with their fingers and an alphabet song video. In the background as children are exploring the letters, part of the Batibot theme song is playing. I love the Batibot song as much as the next person but after listening to it repeat over and over and over as my son explores and slowly writes 28 letters I start to go a bit crazy! There really needs to be a way to turn off the background song or some variety in background music would be nice.


   Batibot TV- screenshot             Batibot TV- screenshot

Games

Unfortunately the Games section which we were most looking forward to has been our least favorite. I hope they have more games in the future. This app is supposed to be for children who are kindergarten aged to grade 3 but our son is 3 years old and even he found the games to be quite easy and a bit babyish. Right now as I’m writing this the “Games” section stopped working and I had to restart it but usually it works pretty well. There are 4 games available.


   Batibot Games- screenshot

Pares-pares is a 6 card memory matching game. Flip the cards to find the matching pairs. Alin ang Naiba shows 4 pictures and the child must choose the one that is different. It starts off very very easy. For example, it will show pictures of 3 frogs and a robot or 3 groups of marbles and a pie. It then moves into more difficult concepts though like running shoes, sandals, boots and a jeepney. Pagsama-Samahin requires the child to sort the objects. Again it starts out very easy with two groups of very different things like robots and eggs that all look the same but gets more difficult like sorting fruits and vegetables or clothes and toys. Finally there is Pagsunod-Sunurin. The child must choose which picture is next in the pattern like: doll, bear, doll, bear….you got it! Doll! Then it moves onto sorting 3 things from small to biggest, biggest to smallest or putting 3 letters from the alphabet in order.


   Batibot Games- screenshot

Karaoke

The karaoke section has 10 songs like Pa-Pa-Parisukat below. Like the story section you need to download each song individually. The ABC song is the same song as the ABC song in the alphabet practice section but the others are original songs with live video, animations or photos. Our son enjoyed all of the songs. In particular, as a family we really liked Isang Linggong Pagkain but the video for this sonng annoyed our son. The image changes very quickly over and over again to the music and he found it difficult to watch which is a shame because he liked that song best.
 

Katuwaan sa Batibot​

I haven't had a chance to check this out yet as I only came across it while writing this review. It appears that there is also still in publication a Filipino activity book for children called Katuwaan sa Batibot. It promises pages to color, games, mazes and counting exercises. It can be purchased through Anvil Publishing

katuwaan sa batibot