Teaching Tagalog to our Kids, Part 1: Flashcards and Books

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I’m Canadian, my husband is from the Philippines and our son was born in Korea (You can read more about our family’s story here!). We of course want our son to love and appreciate his Filipino heritage and a big part of that is learning to speak Tagalog. By being able to speak Tagalog he will be able to connect with his father’s country and join in conversations with his family and other Filipinos more deeply than if he only spoke English.

Teaching him to speak Tagalog while we live in Korea though has been a challenge. Our son attends preschool taught in Korean and he hears Korean everywhere when he leaves the house. My husband and I speak English to each other and it’s easy to find English books, videos and toys either in Korea or online. Though I have studied Tagalog, teaching it to our son is primarily left up to daddy and it isn’t even his first language.

My husband grew up in Negros Occidental on the border of the Ilonggo and Cebuano language regions. They spoke one language at home and when they went to the market they spoke the other.  When he started school his classes were in English and Tagalog so, by the time he was 6 years old he was using the 4 languages on a regular basis. After college he would go on to learn to speak Japanese while living there for 2 years and later learnt to speak Korean before going to Korea to work. I’ve seen him have conversations with groups of people switching back and forth between 3 – 4 different languages! So while he can speak Tagalog he doesn’t use it often and sometimes he struggles to find the words for things.

We tried using the very effective one parent one language technique in our home. I would speak English and my husband Tagalog but since my husband and I were speaking English to each other we would always forget to have him switch to Tagalog when he spoke with our son. Despite knowing many families in Korea with at least one Filipino parent, we have only been able to find 2 families in our city who were also teaching their children Tagalog. One has left and we have lost contact with the other family. A cultural center in our city offered us free space to hold language and cultural classes for Filipino kids but there was no interest from the Filipino community. We have visited Filipino groceries, sporting events, restaurants and churches to expose our son to Tagalog here in Korea as well but people go to these places to spend time with their friends and so he may hear the language but doesn’t get to practice it much at all.

We realized that we were going to have to collect resources to help us to teach our son. Here are some we have used. I hope they can help your family as well!

Tagalog for Kids Flash Cards

We bought the Tuttle Tagalog for Kids and the More Tagalog for Kids flashcards before our son was even born!  Each set includes 64 cards, an audio CD, a poster wall chart and a learning guide for parents with teaching suggestions. On the front of the card is a simple graphic in color with the word in Tagalog. On the back of the card is the English translation and a couple of sentences using the vocabulary word. The CD includes the pronunciation of the words, sentences and some songs.

            

Before our son could even talk he loved looking through the cards and having us tell him over and over what they said. We visited the Philippines for the first time when he was about a year and a half old and as soon as we got out of the airport he started pointing and excitedly yelling “Jeepney! Jeepney!” He had learnt about Jeepney from these cards. Though they are made from strong paper I would recommend having the cards laminated if possible. We ended up laminating ours and it has made them easier to clean and more difficult to damage. Now that our son is older we can work on the sentences with him.

Books

We struggled a bit to find good books in Tagalog but over the past 4 years more have been showing up on the market. We wanted fun and educational stories for our son but we found that a lot of the available Tagalog books are religious or political in content even for very small children. While this is fine for many families, we wanted to keep the topics more lighthearted when he was very young. Another reoccurring theme in many children’s’ books are balikbayan returnee stories. These are a fantastic resource for children who are learning Tagalog because their families are going to move to the Philippines. In our case I was worried that if our son keeps on reading about how he should be moving back to the Philippines he might feel guilty about living abroad. I might be worrying too much though!

It is possible to get books for children in Tagalog online and at the National Bookstore in the Philippines but at the bookstore the Tagalog selection is far smaller than the English book section.  At two of the National Bookstores we visited in the Philippines the employees didn’t even know where the Tagalog children’s book sections were! My husband and I had to search through all the aisles and show them. It was really shocking!

Here are some of our favorite Tagalog kids books:

Lakas and the Manilatown Fish / Si Lakas at ang Isdang Manilatown

Lakas and the Manilatown Fish / Si Lakas at ang Isdang Manilatown was the very first Tagalog book that we got for our son. The story follows Lakas through Manila town in San Francisco as he chases a magical fish and meets unusual characters along the way.  It is a dual language book. On the left side the story is written in Tagalog and on the right it is written in English so in our family daddy reads it in Tagalog and mommy reads it in English. It is aimed at children age 5 and up but we started reading it to our son when he was a baby. The beautiful illustrations kept his attention and he just enjoyed listening to us. Years later, he still enjoys it. The author and illustrator have released a second book Lakas and the Makibaka Hotel / Si Lakas at ang Makibaka Hotel but we have not had the chance to read it yet.

            

Filipino Friends

The book Filipino Friends has been created in the same style as the classic English language Richard Scarry books. The objects in the illustrations have been labeled in both English and Tagalog. The story is only in English though. Included among the pages are points teaching about Filipino culture, foods and even a simple recipe for kalamansi juice!  We enjoy singing Bahay Kubo together when we reach that section of the book. This book does end up being a balikbayan returnee story but it is so full of fun cultural bits we just couldn’t pass it up!

Tagu-Taguan

The illustrations alone in Tagu-Taguan are reason to buy this Filipino counting book! From sampu to isa the reader travels through the garden counting different insects. This book is a bit too difficult for children who are learning to count to read on their own but is a great book to read together as a family. Our son is an insect and number lover so this book was an instant favorite!

Kokak! Kokak!

We actually have 3 books in this series. “Kokak! Kokak!”, “ Mmmmm… Sarap!” and “Prrrrrt…Utot!” There are others in the series as well by the same author and illustrator. They’re funny little books with simple big graphics and few words on the page for young learners.  They can be purchased online and shipped internationally through http://www.anvilpublishing.com/ We got ours at National Bookstore and will be looking for more the next time we visit!

            

 

Adarna House Books

Adarna House Books have been publishing quality books for newborn to teenaged Filipino children since 1980. The following books can all be purchased through http://adarna.com.ph/ and shipped internationally.  They are also available at the National Book Store in the Philippines

Dumaan si Butiki

The award winning Dumaan si Butiki follows a cute little lizard up and down and around the house. It is a young learner’s board book that teaches locations as the little lizard goes left, right, up and under. It can be purchased online and shipped internationally through we purchased our copy in the Philippines.

Ang Una Kong Alpabeto and Kulay!

These two books are small board books with only one or two words on each page. Ideal for babies, they’re nice first books for little hands.

       

Ang Mabait na Kalabaw

We love carabao (just like lolo’s!) and so any book that features them is a hit in our family! Ang Mabait na Kalabaw is a dual language book with Tagalog at the top of the page and English at the bottom.  The good carabao is a role model of good behavior as he goes about his day. There are items to count on each page as well starting at 1 on the first page and finishing with 13 in the last illustration.

Check out part 2 here: Teaching Tagalog to our Kids, Part 2: Batibot!

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Bagan Travel Guide: Travel Tips for Your Next Trip to Myanmar

This Bagan travel guide contains affiliate links which means if you click on one of the affiliate links and make a purchase, I will receive a small commission at no cost to you. All opinions in this Bagan travel guide are my own.

bagan travel guide

Much of our trip to Myanmar was focused around trying to find a connection to my family who had once lived there as part of the British Colonies. We visited Bagan though purely as tourists. We have traveled to Borobudur in Indonesia and Angkor Wat in Cambodia but there is something uniquely special about Bagan. There are more temples to explore than at Borobudur and it currently is much less touristy than Angkor Wat. Find some great tips in this Bagan travel guide.

family atop a temple in bagan

Tickets

Before we went to Myanmar we read a lot of posts from people online suggesting that tourists should not buy the entrance tickets to Bagan. The writers offered tips on how to avoid paying and they promised that no one would ask to see your ticket when you traveled around the city.

monks at a temple in bagan using cell phone

It’s still true that you probably won’t be asked to show your ticket. In 5 days we were only asked to show it once. There are now ticket booths before the exit from the airport in Bagan though so skipping out on paying the fee is not as easy as before. You would need some careful planning to avoid it and at a reasonable 25,000 Kyat or $22 USD per person (our 3 year old son was free) it just doesn’t seem worth the effort. We lined up, got our ticket and were out the door in less than 5 minutes.

ananda temple bagan in the mist at sunrise
Pagoda Phya That Gyi at sunrise bagan myanmar
small white temple with flowers bagan myanmar

Temples

Throughout the desert landscape of Bagan there are more than 2000 temples and other religious structures still standing from the 11th to 13th century. Some of the smaller ones can even be found in the backyards of homes with kids playing soccer around them. The atmosphere around the temples is pretty relaxed and visitors can climb up or go into, nearly any that they wish. But these are still places of worship and religious significance for many. Therefore, shoes must be taken off before you set foot on or in a temple out of respect and to help preserve the monuments.

sunrise temple bagan myanmar

Ananda Temple in bagan myanmar

On August 25th, 2016 a 6.8 magnitude earthquake struck Bagan damaging many of the temples. Restoration is underway and looks like it will continue for quite some time to come. With the devastation a bit of a silver lining has emerged for the city. Much of the damage that occurred was actually restoration work from the 1990’s which had been done quickly and not using original materials. As a result, Bagan did not qualify for UNESCO World Heritage Site status. Aung San Suu Kyi has insisted that the process of restoration be taken slowly and under the guidance of UNESCO. Hopefully when the work is done Bagan will be better than ever and will hold the much deserved status!

shwezigon pagoda at sunset father carrying son with manduca baby carrier bagan myanmar

Temples in the mist bagan myanmar sunrise

Getting Around

Getting around Bagan is pretty easy and economical. We stayed in the Nyaung U area which is within walking distance of quite a few restaurants, shops, and some smaller temples.  You will need some sort of transportation to visit the big temples though.

cows and cart in bagan myanmar

Many places rent bicycles for less than $2 USD a day and some accommodations proved them for free. The area is very flat and so it is an easy ride if you set out early in the morning or late in the afternoon. When the sun is high in the sky the city is incredibly hot and options like e-bikes (around $6 a day) or a car with a driver (around $15 for half a day or $35 for the whole day) may be better options. There is even the popular option of taking a hot air balloon ride over the temples as the sun rise!

Many tourist sites recommend that you spend around 2 days in Bagan but we were there for 5 and we left wishing for more time to explore!

Htilominlo Temple hot air balloon bagan myanmar

Hot air balloon crew bagan myanmar

Hot air balloon crew returning after a morning flight

Bagan with Kids

We found Bagan to be really kid friendly! The side streets were quiet and our son joined other kids chasing bubbles and playing. People in Bagan love kids and they went the extra mile to make sure we were all ok. A group of men even showed him how to play a board game during their lunch breaks. Some hotels in the area have swimming pools as well so kids (and adults!) to cool down a bit from the afternoon heat.

board games street men

Going into and around the temples with kids is very easy but climbing up them is much more of a challenge. The many of the steps are very narrow and you have to walk down some of them sideways! We used our Manduca baby carrier to get our son up and down some of the more steep temples. Even then it was a bit precarious. Not all of them are this difficult though and it is completely doable especially if you just take it slow and steady.

temple stairs bagan myanmar

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Hue Vietnam Travel Guide: Tombs, Towers and Tanks

hue vietnam travel guide

Things To Do In Hue Vietnam

Once the national capital from 1802-1945, Hue Vietnam is home to the ancient Imperial City (Citadel) and the tombs of several emperors. The ancient sites around Hue Vietnam are spectacularly beautiful and it was well worth the visit. Learn more in this Hue Vietnam travel guide!

Hue Imperial City (The Citadel)

Emperors of Vietnam once lived in this walled fortress and palace. Much of the structure was damaged or destroyed by battles with the French in 1947 and American forces in 1969 with only 20 out of 148 structures surviving but it still remains an impressive complex with ongoing restoration.

Hours: 8am – 6pm

hue imperial city citadel
hue imperial city citadel

Hue Vietnam Provincial Museum (War Museum)

This small museum doesn’t appear to even get a mention in the guidebooks but if you are visiting the Imperial City next door and are interested in military exhibits it may be worth a quick visit. The museum is in bad repair. The grass hasn’t been cut in ages and there are large holes in the pavement leading down to the drains below. Staff scurried to turn on fans and lights when we walked in like they weren’t expecting visitors. Inside the museum some photos, small weapons and other wartime paraphernalia can be found.

The only reason we visited (twice!) is that out in front of the museum there is a collection of tanks, a helicopter, a plane and other military vehicles from the Vietnam War.  Each vehicle has a plaque with the name of the vehicle as well as the year and place it was captured from. Our son was THRILLED to see a helicopter so close for the first time and excitedly ran back and forth between each vehicle.

Hours:  8:00-11:00 am, 2:00pm – 5:00pm (closed Sundays)

Hue provincial war museum

Hue provincial war museum

Thien Mu Pagoda

Built in 1601, Thien Mu Pagoda is the tallest religious building in Vietnam. This seven story tower is part of the temple complex on Ha Khe Hill just outside of Hue overlooking the Perfume River.

thien mu pagoda

Not only beautiful, the pagoda has strong historical, political and religious significance in the region. In 1963 the Buddhist Crisis in Vietnam saw the Catholic government cracking down on the Buddhists majority (70-90%) in the country and Buddhism. The crisis began when 9 unarmed Buddhist were shot by the army in Hue. Thein Mu Pagoda became a major organizing point for the movement.  In protest of this crackdown and the government’s refusal to meet calls for religious equality, Buddhist monk Thich Quang Duc drove to Saigon on June 10th, 1963. There in front of onlookers, reporters and supporters he conducted self-immolation by setting himself on fire.

]Self-immolation of Buddhist monk Thích Quảng Đức. Photo by Malcom Browne 1963

Self-immolation of Buddhist monk Thích Quảng Đức. Photo by Malcom Browne 1963

In the background of this world famous image by Malcom Browne the car he drove can be seen. It is presently on display at Thien Mu Pagoda.

Tombs in Hue Vietnam

There are 7 imperial tombs just outside of Hue but the most commonly visited are the Tombs of Emperor Minh Mang, Emperor Tu Duc and Emperor Khai Dinh. We did not have a chance to go to Emperor Tu Duc’s tomb but made it to the other two. When visiting the popular tombs it is best to get there early in the morning before the tour groups arrive or later in the afternoon when they have gone. It can get crowded! We visited Khai Dinh tomb before 9am because there are a lot of steps and we wanted to avoid climbing them in the heat. By 9:30 the tomb was packed with tourists arriving in tour buses. We then went to Minh Mang tomb and even around 10:30 the tour groups were just starting to arrive. Any driver you hire should be able to advise you on what times to go to beat the crowds.  The tour groups seem to have very set roots.

Khai Dinh Tomb

Khai Dinh Tomb took 11 years to build and was completed in 1931. Before his death he visited France resulting in the tomb being a combination of both Western and Eastern styles. Khai Dinh’s tomb is the last of the large imperial tombs in Vietnam.  The dragon sculptures along the sides of this temple were the largest dragons in Vietnam though the Dragon Bridge in Da Nang likely now holds this distinction.

khai dinh tomb hue vietnam

khai dinh tomb hue vietnam

Minh Mang Tomb

The construction of this tomb began in September 1840 but by January 1841, Emperor Minh Mang had passed away. The tomb was fully completed by 1843 under the watchful eye of Emperor Thieu Tri.  The burial grounds include landscaped lakes, and canals as well as beautiful architecture.

minh mang tomb hue vietnam

minh mang tomb hue vietnam

Is Hue Kid Friendly?

hue vietnam

We went to Hue when our son was 3.5 years old. In Da Nang, Hoi An and Hanoi we saw a lot of kids his age and some even younger but in Hue he seemed to be one of the youngest. There aren’t a lot of activities aimed at children in Hue and there are no beach resorts so it’s less appealing to parents traveling with really little ones. It seemed to be more popular with families that had kids 8 years old and up.

That being said, Hue is not unfriendly to kids! Many of the sites are free for younger kids. The Imperial City and Tombs offer a lot of space for kids to stretch their legs and to explore and as a vehicle lover our son really enjoyed the small war museum. We would go out early in the morning and then spend our afternoons in our hotel’s pool or playing indoors in our room. There’s a lot of walking so a good baby carrier that allows you to carry little ones on your back like the Manduca baby carrier can be a life saver if your infant to preschooler is too tired to walk. But short early morning trips, ice cream and swimming pools made Hue a great place to visit with a little one.  If I were to go back through it would definitely be in the winter months! It was 38 degrees the entire time we were there in July!

Getting In And Out

Private Car

We traveled to Hue by car from Hoi An through Da NangHoi An to Hue it is about a 3 hour drive and Da Nang to Hue around 2. The driver can take the route either along Hai Van Pass or through Hai Van Tunnel. At a length of 6.28 km, Hai Van Tunnel is the longest tunnel in Southeast Asia and it can save you between 30 minutes to an hour on your trip between Da Nang and Hue. Hai Van Pass though is much more scenic winding up the mountain and along the coast.  Most drivers and tour buses choose to dive the route along the coast and stop at the top for a break and to enjoy the views. There are shops and restaurants at the top as well.

Cost for a private car:

Around $60-$75 USD

Plane

There are direct flights to Hue Vietnam from Ho Chi Minh City, Dalat and Hanoi. The flights from Ho Chi Minh City and Hanoi arrive daily but Dalat only has flights every other day. We decided to drive into Hue and then flew to Hanoi.

It is also possible to book a local bus, train or a tour bus between the two cities. Tour buses seem to be most popular with group tours that are only going to Hue for the day but your hotel should be able to help you make arrangements.

Getting Around

Walking

We were in Hue in July and it was HOT. Even in the evening it was hot so we didn’t walk around too much. They do though have a nice park and walkway area along the perfume river. In the evening little shops and restaurants open up and it’s a lovely place to take a stroll.

walkway along river hue vietnam

bridge across perfume river hue vietnam

Taxi

Taxis in Hue are cheap and your hotel can easily arrange for them to pick you up. When visiting the sites it is quite common to arrange a set price and have the taxi driver wait for you while you visit. This means that many of the taxis you see waiting may not be available.  A couple of times we did not make these arrangements and were unable to find another available taxi despite being in the city. We did not run into any large problems with taxis in Hue but twice we were brought to the wrong end of a site even though our hotel had arranged the pickup.

Private car

We arranged a private car to visit the tombs outside of the city and to take us to the airport. I wish we had used them our entire time in Hue! They were absolutely fantastic and reasonably priced. There are several companies in the area but here are two we had contact with.

We used this company both times. We were picked up on time (actually the driver was early) in a fantastically clean SUV. Our son was thrilled since he had never driven in a large SUV like this before. All 3 seatbelts in the back were working. Our driver was safe, friendly and knowledgeable.  We decided to use the same company when we went to the airport and had the same experience the second time as well.

Website: http://www.stopandgo-hue.com/
Email: stopandgocafetours@gmail.com

We did not use this company but I was very impressed with their customer service. Their reviews on TripAdvisor are also high. We needed to make a last minute reservation and they were very quick to respond. They also have baby car seats available for small children. Unfortunately I was not able to connect to the internet at our hotel in the evening and when I finally got through to them they were fully booked for the time we wanted to visit the tombs. They offered us a discount if we would go later in the day or offered to take us the next day instead. We were short on time though and wanted a very early start to beat the heat so we went with a different company.

Website: http://www.tourfromhue.com/
Email: tourfromhue@gmail.com

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Hampyeong’s Herptile Eco Park

hampyeong herptile eco park

Hampyeong which is about an hour away from Gwangju, Jeollanamdo, is well known across Korea for its annual Butterfly Festival. Few people, even locally it appears, know about Hampyeong Herptile Eco Park (함평파충류생태공원 ). It’s hard to miss though once you arrive into the area of the Eco Park as the building is shaped like a giant albino Burmese python (they have a live one inside!).

I have not been able to confirm this, but I believe the Herptile Park opened only a few years ago in 2013. The facilities are new, well maintained and clean. The temperature is closely monitored and so on a hot summer day it was lovely and cool inside! There is a collection of more than 600 local and foreign snakes, frogs, toads, turtles, tortoise, and lizards primarily housed on 2 floors of the main building. Inside the main building there is also a theater area but there was no information about shows when we went. There is a separate building outside for some anaconda as well and a nice petting zoo and park area in the back as well.

hampyeong herptile eco park

I am not a big fan of zoos but the animals in these habitats seemed to be well cared for and the workers professional. We arrived at Hampyeong Herptile Eco Park at 9:30am on a holiday Monday and were the only visitors there at the time. They were still setting up for the day and it happened to be feeding time for the pythons. Upon seeing our 3 year old son heading their way the workers discretely put away the bucket of dead mice until he had moved past. Had he been older I’m sure he might have been really interested but I appreciated that they were sensitive to his age.

hampyeong herptile eco park

hampyeong herptile eco park

In the downstairs area there is a small climbing wall, and play and activity area for children. There are also some animals for them to interact with:  couple of birds out on a tree, a horned lizard, some iguanas and a tub of frogs. The frogs were upsetting. I’m sure they were very stressed with the kids reaching in. There was also an area where children can use nets to catch goldfish in two tanks and then rerelease them. Poor fish! Several times a day the Burmese python is also brought out for people to take photos with and interact with. It’s a lovely snake and the handler is good but a lot of people coming to see the snake were acting like idiots, screaming and yelling. The caretakers really need to inforce more calm behavior so as not to stress the snake out! But other than those things, everything and everyone at the place seemed to be working towards making sure the animals were well cared for.

hampyeong herptile eco park

In the back of the building is a small petting zoo with sheep, goats, chickens, and rabbits. It was the cleanest petting zoo I have ever seen! It’s free to enter and for 1,000 won you can buy food to feed the animals. The rabbits seem to have figured out that parents tend to give the food to the children and so one rabbit in particular kept chasing after our son. He was completely thrilled about this rabbit who wanted to run races with him. On your mark, get set bunny. Go!

hampyeong herptile eco park

hampyeong herptile eco park


Hours

0:900 to 18:00 (Regular)

09:00 to 17:00 (November to February)

Closed

Every Monday, New Year Day, Seollal and Chuseok

* If a public holiday is on a Monday the park will be open but the next day (Tuesday) it will be closed


Price (Discounts for groups)  
Adults 3,000
Children 1,000
Kindergarten 1,000
Under Korean Age 4 Free

Website: http://ecopark.or.kr/hp_snake/ (Korean)

Address: 전라남도 함평군 신광면 가덕리 306-1번지


Bus Schedule

* This schedule is subject to change. Call the Hampyeong Bus Terminal at 061) 322-0660 to confirm.

Hampyeong Bus Terminal → Herptile Park Herptile Park →Hampyeong Bus Terminal
6:50 7:35
7:50 8:35
9:05 9:30
10:20 10:45
11:10 11:50
11:30 12:30
12:00 13:35
12:55 14:45
14:05 15:35
14:30 17:05
16:20 18:05
17:25 19:40
19:00  

 

Teaching Tagalog to our Kids, Part 2: Batibot

This article is part 2 on resources we have been using to help us teach our son Tagalog while we are living in South Korea and traveling internationally. These resources can help others teaching children Tagalog both in the Philippines and abroad Please check out part 1 here: Teaching Tagalog to our Kids, Part 1: Flashcards and Books

Batibot

I know what you are probably thinking. "What?! Batibot is still around?" Well the answer is "Yes and no". Like many kids across North America I grew up with Sesame Street and it was also one of the first TV shows our son ever watched. Fun and educational with songs you remember for a lifetime. For many Filipinos growing up in the 80’s and 90’s the equivalent was Batibot! The show was based on Sesame Street and was even originally co-produced with the Children’s Television Workshop. It was on the air from 1985-1998 and then resurrected from 2010 – 2013 before going off the air again.

Try as we may though we have not found much more than a few blurry incomplete episodes on Youtube of Batibot. We have looked online, asked in the facebook groups, searched video hosting sites, and asked in book and video stores in the Philippines and nothing! We aren’t the only people looking. Plenty of online forums are full of parents searching for the show but to this date, despite the demand, DVD's of the series have not been released. The best quality videos you can find of Batibot are from the Batibot saYoutube channel but they only have 9 videos available and the channel hasn't been updated in 4 years. Unfortunately, there just doesn’t seem to be any sort of equivalent in an educational children’s show for young learners in Tagalog these days. 

Batibot Apps

In August 2015 an app based on the Batibot TV program aimed at children from kindergarten to grade 3 was released. There are currently 2 apps:

Cover art                Cover art

Batibot TV and Batibot Games.

I’m not really sure what the purpose of having a separate download for Batibot Games is since the same games are also included in the more extensive Batibot TV app. So, if you’re looking for just games that option is there but from here I’ll just write about Batibot TV. The Batibot TV app includes 4 sections Kwenteng Batibot (stories), ABC, Games and Karaoke.


   Batibot TV- screenshot

Kwenteng Batibot

Kwenteng Batibot currently includes 14 videos to download. The stories are about 5 minutes long and feature simple animations or puppets along with the narrator. Our son enjoyed all of them even though he couldn’t understand them all fully. There seem to be some glitches with this section still. You need to download all of the free stories individually which can take a long if your internet is slow. Even though we have already downloaded all of the stories I often get a pop up asking me if we would like to download our first story. When I click back and enter the story section again the stories are all loaded. Other times I need to re-download “Ang Tinapay” and/or “Paalam”. In general though this section is kid friendly and educational.

ABC

The ABC section has all the letters of the Filipino alphabet. The letter name is said and a word starting with that letter is given. Some of the words, seem to be strange choices for very young children. For example, for “C” the word is “cadena de amor”. Most though are great examples of words related to Filipino culture. There is also a section where children can practice writing the letters with their fingers and an alphabet song video. In the background as children are exploring the letters, part of the Batibot theme song is playing. I love the Batibot song as much as the next person but after listening to it repeat over and over and over as my son explores and slowly writes 28 letters I start to go a bit crazy! There really needs to be a way to turn off the background song or some variety in background music would be nice.


   Batibot TV- screenshot             Batibot TV- screenshot

Games

Unfortunately the Games section which we were most looking forward to has been our least favorite. I hope they have more games in the future. This app is supposed to be for children who are kindergarten aged to grade 3 but our son is 3 years old and even he found the games to be quite easy and a bit babyish. Right now as I’m writing this the “Games” section stopped working and I had to restart it but usually it works pretty well. There are 4 games available.


   Batibot Games- screenshot

Pares-pares is a 6 card memory matching game. Flip the cards to find the matching pairs. Alin ang Naiba shows 4 pictures and the child must choose the one that is different. It starts off very very easy. For example, it will show pictures of 3 frogs and a robot or 3 groups of marbles and a pie. It then moves into more difficult concepts though like running shoes, sandals, boots and a jeepney. Pagsama-Samahin requires the child to sort the objects. Again it starts out very easy with two groups of very different things like robots and eggs that all look the same but gets more difficult like sorting fruits and vegetables or clothes and toys. Finally there is Pagsunod-Sunurin. The child must choose which picture is next in the pattern like: doll, bear, doll, bear….you got it! Doll! Then it moves onto sorting 3 things from small to biggest, biggest to smallest or putting 3 letters from the alphabet in order.


   Batibot Games- screenshot

Karaoke

The karaoke section has 10 songs like Pa-Pa-Parisukat below. Like the story section you need to download each song individually. The ABC song is the same song as the ABC song in the alphabet practice section but the others are original songs with live video, animations or photos. Our son enjoyed all of the songs. In particular, as a family we really liked Isang Linggong Pagkain but the video for this sonng annoyed our son. The image changes very quickly over and over again to the music and he found it difficult to watch which is a shame because he liked that song best.
 

Katuwaan sa Batibot​

I haven't had a chance to check this out yet as I only came across it while writing this review. It appears that there is also still in publication a Filipino activity book for children called Katuwaan sa Batibot. It promises pages to color, games, mazes and counting exercises. It can be purchased through Anvil Publishing

katuwaan sa batibot

Dolmeori Beach in Hampyeong South Korea

Only about an hour drive away from Gwangju, Dolmeori Beach in Hampyeong is one of the closest beaches to the city. We usually make it out to the beach a couple of times a year but like many beaches along Korea’s west coast extremes in the difference between high and low tide can make it difficult to catch a good day for swimming. When the tide goes out at Dolmeori beach it goes waaaaaaaaay out! You were left having to consult tide times and charts if you wanted to dip your toes in the ocean.

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I think I can maybe see the ocean out there somewhere…

Earlier this spring we went to the beach for a picnic and found that the beach was gone! There were heavy construction vehicles digging up the beach and a giant hole was in its place.  To the left side of the lookout tower is a rocky beach with a little sand and it was great for our picnic but we were left wondering what had happened to the main beach! This month we were told that they had built two pools and we headed out this past weekend to check it out.

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They have built 3 new pools along the beach area and they are free to use. There is a very small splash pool less than half a foot deep. When we went there was no water in it. Beside it they have built a larger children’s pool that is about a foot to two feet deep. There is a shade covering for parents watching close by. This pool is chlorinated fresh water. 20160807_092845

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In the past Dolmeori beach did have a bit of an enclosure that helped to keep some of the water close to the beach when the tides were going in and out but it only made a small difference. When we visited on Sunday the tide was completely out but this new ocean pool was still full of water! It is enclosed only on 3 sides with the 4th side being the actual beach. They have also made the far end of the pool quite deep so more experiences swimmers can go for a proper swim.
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The water isn’t clear. It’s a bit murky with kicked up sand but despite this, I’ve been told that the water at Dolmeori may actually be cleaner than some of the beaches in the area with more clear water. I’m not sure at this point how they are filling the pool but even when the tide was out we could feel cold water temperature changes in some areas so the water was moving and not just sitting still there in the tank.

20160807_095527It is possible to go camping at the beach and there is a small area with trees with limited space as well as additional spaces along the sand. To rent an elevated platform area for the day or night it is 20,000 won – 30,000 won. Small tents are currently free but you are required to purchase a garbage bag for 3,000 won from them which they will dispose of when you leave. Larger tents may be required to pay a fee but they didn’t tell us the exact price. I would guess it possibly depends on just how big your monster tent is!

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How to Get There: There is a bus at the Hampyeong Bus Terminal that heads to Dolmeori beach. It runs from 06:40-19:30 every 80 minuets. It takes about 20 min to get to the beach from the terminal.

Address: 616-10, Dolmeori-gil, Hampyeong-eup, Hampyeong-gun, Jeollanam-do 
전라남도 함평군 함평읍 주포로 614 (함평읍)

Phone Number: +82-61-322-0011

Hoi An, Vietnam: Spending Some Time Around the Old Town

In 1999, the old town of Hoi An was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The narrow streets are lined with buildings from centuries ago and in the evening lanterns light their way. Hoi An is more than just this historic town though! Beautiful white sand beaches line the coast, fantastic restaurants can be found and it is about an hour away from the temple complex My Son. Found around 40 minutes south of Da Nang International Airport, Hoi An makes it an easy day trip or a logical second destination from Da Nang on your trip to Vietnam.

Accommodation

We booked our room at the fantastic Essence Hoi An Hotel & Spa. Just on the outskirts of town we were given a huge room with a fantastic floor to ceiling window overlooking the rice fields. Our son loved spending time just sitting in the window and watching the world go by. We witnessed some of the best sunsets I’ve ever seen there and even saw some rare iridescent clouds one evening!

Though being outside of the main part of town may seem inconvenient it actually worked out really well for us! Essence Hoi An Hotel & Spa provide free bicycles for their guests to use and they do have seats for children. The busy main road can feel intimidating especially with kids in tow but right in front of the hotel is a small street that follows the path of the river. You can take this small road all the way right into the old town avoiding nearly all of the traffic!20160711_192259_HDR
Plan your trip to Hoi An with TripAdvisor! 

As well as bicycles to use free of charge Essence Hoi An Hotel & Spa also offers a shuttle service several times a day to the old quarter and the beach. If you aren’t feeling up to going to the beach they have a lovely pool on site! They can also arrange transportation and tours outside of town for a competitive price.  

The hotel has a great restaurant and will even prepare special meals to order at breakfast for people with special dietary needs. If you’re looking for something a little different a bike ride to the main restaurant area in the old quarter is less than 10 minutes away. We found ourselves getting dinner at the Indian restaurant Ganesh a couple of evenings while in Hoi An. Ganesh makes some of the best Indian food we’ve had anywhere, including India! It’s no wonder they were packed the first time we were there but luckily they offer take out as well. There are a fair number of child friendly items on their large menu as well.DSC_4868Best of all were the staff at the hotel! They went out of their way to talk to us, make sure we were ok and were exceptionally friendly. Everyone made an effort to learn our son’s name and to interact with him as well as with my husband and I. He felt right at home and needed to make sure to say goodbye to everyone before we left. Essence Hoi An Hotel & Spa is family friendly while retaining a feeling of class and professionalism. We highly recommend them!

Beaches

The two main beaches in Hoi An are Cua Dai beach which is closer to the old quarter and An Bang beach a little further north. Though many resorts can still be found at Cua Dai beach, much of this beach was washed away by erosion in 2014. Climate change, bad weather, hydropower dams, and sand mining have all been listed as contributing factors and sandbags lie in place of the beach in an attempt to prevent the erosion from continuing further. Due to the loss of Cua Dai beach, many tourists now choose to stay at beach resorts in Da Nang instead and those staying locally have now moved to An Bang beach. Though An Bang beach has been affected by erosion too, it is not to the extent that Cua Dai beach has and efforts are being made to help protect it. An Bang Beach remains a beautiful white sand beach.DSC_4810We visited An Bang Beach a couple of times during our stay in Hoi An. The chairs were free to use when we visited which we a good thing as it was exceptionally hot those days and there is little shade on the beach otherwise. Unlike Da Nang where there was no one trying to sell us souvenirs on the beach, An Bang Beach did have vendors and some were quite aggressive, one man so much so that he brought me to tears. Only when I was crying did he finally leave me alone. In all my travels, I have never run into a vender on the beach as unpleasant as he was. The others were persistent but not aggressive.DSC_4884There are a lot of restaurants around An Bang Beach and even some small convenience style stores which sell imported goods. I spotted Lays chips and Cheerios here and nowhere else on our travels in Vietnam. Our hotel’s shuttle dropped us off at the beach road near An Bang Beach Village Restaurant. The restaurant will take your order and bring your meal right out to your beach chair. That was a lifesaver when a certain 3 year old didn’t want to stop playing in the sand even though it was lunch time! We particularly liked their scallops and their fish wrapped in a banana leaf.

Old Town

In the evening, the place to be in Hoi An is the Old Town. The streets are closed to cars and motorcycles and as the sun sets the lanterns are lit. A ticket is required to visit the old town but despite the government’s efforts to make it clearer, there is a lot of confusion still. Previously a ticket was only required to visit sites within the old town and not to just walk around but it seems that now you need a ticket to wander the streets.  Each ticket costs 80,000 VND for locals and 120,000 VND for foreign tourists. The proceeds from the ticket sales go back into helping to maintain the town. We arrived fairly early one evening around the same time as a large tour group and so we were asked to purchase a ticket. The other days we arrived later in the evening or through other gates and were not asked to purchase a ticket nor did we have our ticket checked. We were told that the ticket is valid for 5 days and so we kept it on us each time we went just in case but I have also heard that it is valid for 10 days.

A night market is also set up each evening where you can buy souvenirs or one of the town’s famous lanterns for yourself! Don’t worry about how you are going to bring it home. They collapse down for easy packing! DSC_4816Some of the vendors will quote ridiculously high prices requiring a lot of haggling. One shirt I bought was originally quoted as being $30 but I got it for around $7 in the end. Checking out other shops to compare what they are asking for helps give you a good idea of what the going price is. Other items we didn’t bother to barter as it seemed like a reasonable price to us, though I’m sure locals pay less. Something we’ve never run into in our travels elsewhere but happened several times in Vietnam is that a vendor would quote a ridiculously high price and refuse to negotiate. In that case it is best to just walk away and forget about it…sometimes though it pays to go back.DSC_4768After being dragged around by mommy and daddy in the heat to the market our son REALLY wanted a cheaply made green backhoe toy, the kind you see at the dollar store back home. The woman wanted $7 for it and absolutely refused to budge on the price. We went off and wouldn’t you know, she was the only vendor with a green backhoe! Lots of yellow and orange ones but no green. Daddy went back to try again and the woman absolutely refused to budge on the price…until her elderly mother came by and told her to smarten up! He ended up getting it for about $2.50 which is still more than it’s worth I’m sure but our little boy was thrilled.DSC_4782

DSC_4784My Son Temple Complex

Built around the 4th century AD until around the 14th century AD, the My Son Hindu temple complex is a UNESCO designated World Heritage Site just outside of Hoi An. Over 70 temples and tombs make up the site but it was badly damaged by carpet bombing during the war. Restoration and maintenance of remaining buildings continues to this day.DSC_4798Day bus tours from Hoi An cost around $5-$7, not including admission to the site. It takes about an hour to get to My Son from Hoi An and tours spend about an hour and a half at the site. Private cars can also be arranged but we decided to use the more economical option of a group tour. In our case a small mini bus picked us up from our hotel and brought us to the site. There was a guide included in that price but because we were traveling with a small child we told the guide that we would visit the site at our own pace separately. This was perfectly fine. It took us about half an hour to walk the complex, explore a bit and to sit under a tree to have a small snack. The tour group spent about an hour and a half.DSC_4799The site is well maintained and easy to walk around. There is also a lot of wild life around My Son. I have never seen so many large butterflies in my life! They were absolutely everywhere! We also saw a really cool lizard. It is not wheelchair or stroller accessible in some parts though. We did see a couple with a stroller but they had to carry it over some rough sections and up some stairs to get closer to the temple. If you can bare the heat, a baby carrier is probably a better option. DSC_4804As interesting as My Son is though, if you have visited any of the larger temple complexes in Asia like Angkor Wat in Cambodia or the Bagan temples in Myanmar you will likely feel underwhelmed. In the summer it is also exceptionally hot. Unless you are a really big fan of temples, I would skip it in the summer if you are traveling with small children. In cooler weather though it’s a great place to explore for an hour or so.

Also Nearby
Da Nang is only 40 minutes from the ancient city of Hoi An. Click here to read about what we did in Da Nang!

Vietnam travel guide - 13th edition, 13th Edition Aug 2016 by Lonely Planet

Vietnam travel guide – 13th edition, 13th Edition Aug 2016 by Lonely Planet

Colour maps and images throughout Highlights and itineraries help you tailor your trip to your personal needs and interests Insider tips to save time and money and get around like a local, avoiding crowds and trouble spots Essential info at your fingertips – hours of operation, phone numbers, websites, transit tips, prices Honest reviews for all budgets – eating, sleeping, sight-seeing, going out, shopping, hidden gems that most guidebooks miss Cultural insights give you a richer, more rewarding travel experience – history, people & culture, food & drink, arts & architecture, environment Free, convenient pull-out Ho Chi Minh City & Hanoi map (included in print version), plus over 86 maps. By Iain Stewart , Benedict Walker , Nick Ray , Anna Kaminski, Jessica Lee , Brett Atkinson . 13th Edition Aug 2016. . 520 pages, 192 pp colour, 93 maps.


Manduca Baby Carrier Traveling With Kids Review

When our son was 3 and a half years old we made a trip to Vietnam.  As I start to pack there is noticeably less “stuff” that we are bringing this time. Our stroller is staying at home. We don’t really use it any more. Completely toilet trained, there are no diapers. No booster seats, sippy cups or travel sterilizer bags. And I have become aware that this would likely be the last trip for our Manduca baby carrier.

7 month 7 unjusa templeBabywearing isn’t really a trend in South Korea where we live. It’s more just a normal, everyday thing that parents do here until the baby can walk. The city roads are busy, sidewalks bumpy and a lot of businesses are completely wheelchair or stroller inaccessible. I’ve had to carry my sleeping son in his stroller up 10 steps just to get to the bank machine! Carrying your baby without the stroller just makes a whole lot more sense sometimes.

It’s also very much tradition in South Korea. It’s not uncommon to see 70 or 80 year old grandmothers carrying their grandchildren on their backs in a modern style podaegi (blanket wrap style carriers) like they once did with their own children. So, when I became pregnant back in 2012 finding a good carrier was much more on my mind than checking out the latest trends in strollers.

The very first baby iten that we bought for our son was our Manduca baby carrier. As an excited new mom I shared the news with my friends and family who are online just to have one friend pipe up and tell me that I could have bought a similar Korean carrier for half the price. I was confident though that the quality wasn’t the same. After all these years I still consider it the best investment in an item for childcare that we bought and worth every penny spent!

The Details

The Manduca carrier can be used for newborns up to children weighing 20 kg. One of the things we liked about the carrier was that the newborn insert is sewn right into the carrier. There was no need to buy an additional insert! The back also extends to give older children more support. It has wide belts at the hip and shoulder and is adjusted to fit the person doing the carrying easily and quickly. The carrier fit both my husband and myself comfortably and we could switch the carrier to the other parent in seconds. It can be used on the front, back and hip. We never found any need to carry our son on our hips but that option is there if desired.

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Travel

I don’t think there is a carrier out there that I would have liked more for traveling. Every country we visited we ran into other parents who were also using the Manduca baby carrier in their travels. At one point we purchased a metal frame hiking carrier. It fit my husband fine but cut into my back and it took up so much space in our baggage. The Manduca carrier though was nearly always comfortable to wear, weighs only 600 g, took up about as much space as a pair of jeans in our luggage, and it held up fantastically after many many many washes.

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Quite some time after we bought it I accidentally closed the buckle for the waist strap in the car door. It cracked but still held up perfectly! When our son was 3 years old we decided to buy a new (used) Manduca from a friend. We were going to be climbing up temples in Bagan, Myanmar with our son on our back and were a bit concerned about all the weight on the crack now that he was older. At that time, other than a little fraying at the edges and fading of the fabric everything else about the carrier was still fine.

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This trip will likely be our last one with the Manduca carrier. Our son is tall for his age and is reaching the upper weight limits. It’s going to be a whole different experience when we can no longer just put him on our back, grab our bags and go! We’ve hiked mountains in Korea, climbed Borobudur in Indonesia at sunrise, and visited the snow monkeys in Japan all with the help of our Manduca carrier.

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manduca baby carrier

Manila, Philippines for your Next Family Vacation!

Manila is a great place for a family Philippines vacation …really! I know what you’re thinking. It’s busy, crowded and the traffic is bad. There are no beaches. When I told my husband I was going to write a post on why Manila is a great place for a family Philippines vacation he made that same face that you are probably making right now! Which is exactly why I had decided to write this post.

We’ve spent a few days here and there in Manila on several occasions over the years and other than the shady taxi situation at the airport we have never had any problems. On our last trip to the Philippines though we actually planned some vacation time in the city with our son and we had a fantastic time (which my husband DID end up remembering)!

The Manila Jeepney

Thanks to the Tagalog for Kids Flash Card set we have at home “Jeepney” was one of the first vehicle words our son learnt along with car and truck. On our first trip to the Philippines to meet his lolo and lola we arrived around midnight in Manila. We pulled out of the airport in our taxi and there it was: “Jeepney!” He was only 21 months old at the time but it was a dream come true. Everywhere he looked, there they were. The taxi driver found it more than a little amusing that there was this little boy pointing out and yelling in excitement “Jeepney! Jeepney!” over and over. The next year when we visited we kept our eyes open for the brightly painted icons of the city, added additional toys to his Jeepney collection and even got to “drive” a Jeepney.

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Driving a Jeepney on display at Manila Ocean Park

Kids love Jeepneys and so do tourists on their Philippines vacation! The Jeepney is to Manila like the streetcar is to San Francisco. Though you can still track down some fantastically styled Jeepneys for your little car lover to marvel at they are becoming increasingly less common. Or at least the painted ones are.

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The most impressive Jeepney we saw in Manila. They are becoming less common.

I’ve heard two different takes on why this is. In the media I read that it is getting too expensive for drivers to decorate their Jeepneys. This may be true but I find it hard to believe. There are companies out there that offer to sponsor decorations and the more attractive Jeepneys tended to get more business in the past. When we were in Manila several different taxi drivers told us that the real reason was because of tension between the drivers of the decorated and not decorated Jeepneys. They said that the drivers of the non-decorated vehicles were unhappy that they were getting less business and that rules may have been put in place to discourage the decoration to create a more equal playing field. Whatever the reason, our son loves the Jeepney and the decorated ones even more so. Hopefully measures are taken to preserve this part of the Filipino culture and tradition.

Hotel H2O and Manila Ocean Park

On the way to the hotel our son fell asleep. We checked in, went to our room, placed him on the bed and waited. When he woke up he slowly sat up in bed and looked around unsure of where he was and then…fish! An entire wall of our room was a giant aquarium! We couldn’t have planned the surprise any better.

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He doesn't know yet that he's sleeping in an aquarium!

Located in Luneta, Manila behind the Quirino Grandstand and actually situated on Manila Bay, Hotel H2O features aquarium themed rooms. There are rooms that have beautiful views of Manila Bay but what we were after was the “Aqua” themed room. In the Aqua rooms an entire wall of the room is an aquarium. The fish are not confined to your room but rather the aquarium goes between the rooms so your visitors are always changing. We spent ages excitedly waiting for “Dory” to make her appearance in our room again. Twice a day the fish are fed in your room so each guest gets to see a great display of fish gathering at that time.

philippines vacation

Feeding time. We found Dory!

On the same grounds of Hotel H20 is Manila Ocean Park. Ocean Park is an 8,000 square meter oceanarium which features a 25 meter long underwater walkway, the tallest musical fountain in the Philippines, numerous tanks of fish and other underwater sea life, a penguin exhibit and a sea lion performance to name a few.

When we stayed at Hotel H20 we had just returned from a trip to Apo Island and Oslob to see the sea turtles and whale sharks so we were not very interested in visiting Ocean Park. I have heard mixed reviews of Ocean Park. Some people love it and others not so much. It really seems to depend on what you are expecting and which exhibits you attend.

Manila Ocean Park, Birds of Prey Kingdom

We did though check out Ocean Park’s newest attraction the Birds of Prey Kingdom. Our son loves birds and we thought it would be a great opportunity for him to see some up close. I think perhaps we didn’t read the description properly but when we saw that it was BirdS of Prey we thought there would be a variety of birds. Instead there is only the Brahminy Kite (the Lawin or Banog). The enclosure was also smaller than expected and we lost interest after about 10 minutes. We only bought tickets for that attraction. If you have purchased a pass it is worth checking out. A great chance to see a beautiful local bird up close and they seem healthy and well cared for.

Rizal Park and Intramuros

Probably about a 5 minute walk from Hotel H2O is Rizal Park. Traveling with a VERY active child we went there many times during our trip to Manila just to run and play. The thing that really struck me about this park is how alive it is. Early in the morning as the sun is rising, joggers run around in the cooler morning air and around noon people from local businesses gather to have their lunch. You can catch a ride around the park on a kalesa (horse drawn carriage). In the evening the park is full of families playing together, students practicing their dance routines and couples on dates. It was one of our favourite places to go as a family in Manila. In the evening they also have a fairly impressive light and music show at the fountain. FAQ.ph has an interesting post on some of the historical and national highlights at the park.

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The kalesa ride 

The light and music show at the fountain at night

A 15 minute walk from Rizal Park is Intramuros though you might want to opt for the 7 min taxi drive instead. The walking route was poorly marked and whenever we asked for directions the people in the area surprisingly didn’t seem to know the way or sent us in the wrong direction. Our walk ended up taking us over an hour!

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Intramuros is the oldest district of Manila and the historic center of the city. Once you get there though there are ruins, old churches and buildings, walls, and prisons to explore and discover. Kids (and parents!) can get swept away pretending they are soldiers of Fort Santiago and imagining where the gold from the legend of Yamashita’s Treasure might be hidden!


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