Bagan Travel Guide: Travel Tips for Your Next Trip to Myanmar

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bagan travel guide

Much of our trip to Myanmar was focused around trying to find a connection to my family who had once lived there as part of the British Colonies. We visited Bagan though purely as tourists. We have traveled to Borobudur in Indonesia and Angkor Wat in Cambodia but there is something uniquely special about Bagan. There are more temples to explore than at Borobudur and it currently is much less touristy than Angkor Wat. Find some great tips in this Bagan travel guide.

family atop a temple in bagan

Tickets

Before we went to Myanmar we read a lot of posts from people online suggesting that tourists should not buy the entrance tickets to Bagan. The writers offered tips on how to avoid paying and they promised that no one would ask to see your ticket when you traveled around the city.

monks at a temple in bagan using cell phone

It’s still true that you probably won’t be asked to show your ticket. In 5 days we were only asked to show it once. There are now ticket booths before the exit from the airport in Bagan though so skipping out on paying the fee is not as easy as before. You would need some careful planning to avoid it and at a reasonable 25,000 Kyat or $22 USD per person (our 3 year old son was free) it just doesn’t seem worth the effort. We lined up, got our ticket and were out the door in less than 5 minutes.

ananda temple bagan in the mist at sunrise
Pagoda Phya That Gyi at sunrise bagan myanmar
small white temple with flowers bagan myanmar

Temples

Throughout the desert landscape of Bagan there are more than 2000 temples and other religious structures still standing from the 11th to 13th century. Some of the smaller ones can even be found in the backyards of homes with kids playing soccer around them. The atmosphere around the temples is pretty relaxed and visitors can climb up or go into, nearly any that they wish. But these are still places of worship and religious significance for many. Therefore, shoes must be taken off before you set foot on or in a temple out of respect and to help preserve the monuments.

sunrise temple bagan myanmar

Ananda Temple in bagan myanmar

On August 25th, 2016 a 6.8 magnitude earthquake struck Bagan damaging many of the temples. Restoration is underway and looks like it will continue for quite some time to come. With the devastation a bit of a silver lining has emerged for the city. Much of the damage that occurred was actually restoration work from the 1990’s which had been done quickly and not using original materials. As a result, Bagan did not qualify for UNESCO World Heritage Site status. Aung San Suu Kyi has insisted that the process of restoration be taken slowly and under the guidance of UNESCO. Hopefully when the work is done Bagan will be better than ever and will hold the much deserved status!

shwezigon pagoda at sunset father carrying son with manduca baby carrier bagan myanmar

Temples in the mist bagan myanmar sunrise

Getting Around

Getting around Bagan is pretty easy and economical. We stayed in the Nyaung U area which is within walking distance of quite a few restaurants, shops, and some smaller temples.  You will need some sort of transportation to visit the big temples though.

cows and cart in bagan myanmar

Many places rent bicycles for less than $2 USD a day and some accommodations proved them for free. The area is very flat and so it is an easy ride if you set out early in the morning or late in the afternoon. When the sun is high in the sky the city is incredibly hot and options like e-bikes (around $6 a day) or a car with a driver (around $15 for half a day or $35 for the whole day) may be better options. There is even the popular option of taking a hot air balloon ride over the temples as the sun rise!

Many tourist sites recommend that you spend around 2 days in Bagan but we were there for 5 and we left wishing for more time to explore!

Htilominlo Temple hot air balloon bagan myanmar

Hot air balloon crew bagan myanmar

Hot air balloon crew returning after a morning flight

Bagan with Kids

We found Bagan to be really kid friendly! The side streets were quiet and our son joined other kids chasing bubbles and playing. People in Bagan love kids and they went the extra mile to make sure we were all ok. A group of men even showed him how to play a board game during their lunch breaks. Some hotels in the area have swimming pools as well so kids (and adults!) to cool down a bit from the afternoon heat.

board games street men

Going into and around the temples with kids is very easy but climbing up them is much more of a challenge. The many of the steps are very narrow and you have to walk down some of them sideways! We used our Manduca baby carrier to get our son up and down some of the more steep temples. Even then it was a bit precarious. Not all of them are this difficult though and it is completely doable especially if you just take it slow and steady.

temple stairs bagan myanmar

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Manduca Baby Carrier Traveling With Kids Review

When our son was 3 and a half years old we made a trip to Vietnam.  As I start to pack there is noticeably less “stuff” that we are bringing this time. Our stroller is staying at home. We don’t really use it any more. Completely toilet trained, there are no diapers. No booster seats, sippy cups or travel sterilizer bags. And I have become aware that this would likely be the last trip for our Manduca baby carrier.

7 month 7 unjusa templeBabywearing isn’t really a trend in South Korea where we live. It’s more just a normal, everyday thing that parents do here until the baby can walk. The city roads are busy, sidewalks bumpy and a lot of businesses are completely wheelchair or stroller inaccessible. I’ve had to carry my sleeping son in his stroller up 10 steps just to get to the bank machine! Carrying your baby without the stroller just makes a whole lot more sense sometimes.

It’s also very much tradition in South Korea. It’s not uncommon to see 70 or 80 year old grandmothers carrying their grandchildren on their backs in a modern style podaegi (blanket wrap style carriers) like they once did with their own children. So, when I became pregnant back in 2012 finding a good carrier was much more on my mind than checking out the latest trends in strollers.

The very first baby iten that we bought for our son was our Manduca baby carrier. As an excited new mom I shared the news with my friends and family who are online just to have one friend pipe up and tell me that I could have bought a similar Korean carrier for half the price. I was confident though that the quality wasn’t the same. After all these years I still consider it the best investment in an item for childcare that we bought and worth every penny spent!

The Details

The Manduca carrier can be used for newborns up to children weighing 20 kg. One of the things we liked about the carrier was that the newborn insert is sewn right into the carrier. There was no need to buy an additional insert! The back also extends to give older children more support. It has wide belts at the hip and shoulder and is adjusted to fit the person doing the carrying easily and quickly. The carrier fit both my husband and myself comfortably and we could switch the carrier to the other parent in seconds. It can be used on the front, back and hip. We never found any need to carry our son on our hips but that option is there if desired.

23 month 23

Travel

I don’t think there is a carrier out there that I would have liked more for traveling. Every country we visited we ran into other parents who were also using the Manduca baby carrier in their travels. At one point we purchased a metal frame hiking carrier. It fit my husband fine but cut into my back and it took up so much space in our baggage. The Manduca carrier though was nearly always comfortable to wear, weighs only 600 g, took up about as much space as a pair of jeans in our luggage, and it held up fantastically after many many many washes.

26 months 2015 indo (3)

Quite some time after we bought it I accidentally closed the buckle for the waist strap in the car door. It cracked but still held up perfectly! When our son was 3 years old we decided to buy a new (used) Manduca from a friend. We were going to be climbing up temples in Bagan, Myanmar with our son on our back and were a bit concerned about all the weight on the crack now that he was older. At that time, other than a little fraying at the edges and fading of the fabric everything else about the carrier was still fine.

38 months DSC_4107

38 months DSC_4163

This trip will likely be our last one with the Manduca carrier. Our son is tall for his age and is reaching the upper weight limits. It’s going to be a whole different experience when we can no longer just put him on our back, grab our bags and go! We’ve hiked mountains in Korea, climbed Borobudur in Indonesia at sunrise, and visited the snow monkeys in Japan all with the help of our Manduca carrier.

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manduca baby carrier

Myanmar Photo Highlights

In February 2016 we traveled to Myanmar. My husband, son and I were the first family members in more than 60 years to return to the place where my grandmother and her sisters had grown up. Both Bub and I, being Canadian needed tourist visa's but since Daddy is from the Philippines he could travel to the country for 14 days without a visa. After that he too would need a visa so we kept our trip within the 14 days. We visited Yangon, the city where my grandmother was born and then ended our trip in Mandalay the city where she and her family lived until the time they left Burma. In the middle of the trip we also traveled to the ancient city of Bagan. Though my grandmother had been born in Yangon, we focused our efforts on trying to search for places the family had been in Mandalay.

Yangon
shwedagon pagoda at sunrise

Shwedagon Pagoda at sunrise

monks at shwedagon pagoda at sunrise

Little monks praying

Check out some of the top hotels in Myanmar at TripAdvisor!~ 

Bagan
hot air balloons baganHot air balloons flying over the temples in Bagan.
men playing board game in bagan myanmarBub and Daddy learning how to play a game. 

cow cart farmers bagan myanmar
Mandalay
boats at u bein bridge myanmarBoats at sunrise at U Bein Bridge in Amarapura just outside of Mandalay

fisherman at u bein bridge myanmarMan fishing

monk at u bein bridge myanmarDaddy and Bub having a chat with a local monk. Monks in the area will often go to the bridge to have a chat with visitors to practice their English.

Follow this link to read how our search for family in Myanmar began!
Follow this link for suggestions on where to start your family search!